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HATE FREE ZONE

17th April 2014

Link reblogged from Shark Rising with 136 notes

[FLIGHT RISING] New Members Giveaway! [ENDS APRIL 20, 2014] →

sharkrising:

To celebrate the new influx of registrations, I’m having an impromptu giveaway! I’ve got lots of fun stuff hoarded from playing throughout the winter, as well as some cute dragons and hatchlings I have no room for, so I’m hosting a giveaway to send some nice stuff to the newbies.

Rules:

- You…

20th is my birthday it would be cool to win something!

username: clowder ID#: 52522

16th April 2014

Photo reblogged from Ylisse's Resident Bride with 6 notes

ylissean-bride:

hopesplode:

ylissean-bride:

Does anyone want this icy guy? I got him from a nest today and he was the only one that I didn’t really want to exalt, but I also can’t keep him.
He’s ice tiger/ice basic/blue gembond, unnamed, and free to a good home. I’d love it if you named him after someone from Fire Emblem because his parents are Colm and Neimi, but really, he just needs a nice home c:

is this little guy still available? c:

Sorry, no D: I can PM you when his parents hatch another nest, though, if you’d like

oh no worries! but that would be great if you don’t mind/have more little guys available later on. either way though, thanks anyway!~

ylissean-bride:

hopesplode:

ylissean-bride:

Does anyone want this icy guy? I got him from a nest today and he was the only one that I didn’t really want to exalt, but I also can’t keep him.

He’s ice tiger/ice basic/blue gembond, unnamed, and free to a good home. I’d love it if you named him after someone from Fire Emblem because his parents are Colm and Neimi, but really, he just needs a nice home c:

is this little guy still available? c:

Sorry, no D: I can PM you when his parents hatch another nest, though, if you’d like

oh no worries! but that would be great if you don’t mind/have more little guys available later on. either way though, thanks anyway!~

11th April 2014

Audio post reblogged from INDIE MUSIC FOR THE RECORD with 25 notes - Played 253 times

Tagged: jonsigo domusic

31st March 2014

Photo reblogged from with 91,304 notes

Tagged: OH NOOOcats in sweaterscatscat

Source: weffanie

31st March 2014

Photoset reblogged from with 16,141 notes

Tagged: opossumrodents twnot actually rodents but opossums look like little rats kinda

Source: hvashi

31st March 2014

Audio post reblogged from i will hold on hope with 183,624 notes - Played 913,685 times

johannathemad:

schrodingersvet:

crab-cakes:

mukuroikusaba:

image

I CANT FUCKING BELIEVE WHAT I AM SEEING

I lied. This is it. This is the whole series.

How the fuck has no one made a comic to this yet

Tagged: i never want to lose this againyou were looking for thisfunnyattack on titani showed this to waverli and she said this was me all today.

Source: returnable

31st March 2014

Link reblogged from WE'RE ALL MAD HERE with 2,922 notes

How The Most Expensive Game Jam In History Crashed And Burned In A Single Day →

catbountry:

lizawithazed:

paulsrockinpagoda:

To say there is an uncomfortable air of fear in security is one (perhaps overblown) thing. To see the largest and only production of its kind, with hundreds of thousands of dollars on the line and an entire secondary production company locked in silent rapture under lit signage for Mountain Dew, the entire project gloriously rupturing like the belly of the Bismark – that is another. To be ushered by muted fear and nervous glances, to stand in desolate directors rooms filled with black screens and empty chairs. Darkened judging stands. Color-coded team challenge floors, soon to be dismantled, but left intact in the hopes that some shimmering archangel would descend and reinvigorate the 11 indie developers currently revolting against Maker Studios inside their rented Winnebagos.

To see the funeral procession of high creatives and story writers and production directors as they left the studio lot, heads down, on their way to a punishment tribunal we would only learn about in cracked voices and quaking half-jokes. The fake grass, crushed cigarette butts and empty beer cans; the trays upon trays of uneaten catering. And the understanding that it was a total wash – completely unsalvageable from a production standpoint – while the developers sat in tears, horror and shock on brand-integrated lawn chairs mere yards from a freelance crew already looking for their next gigs.

This is a very important article about an even that happened this past weekend at Maker Studios, one of the major production companies that manage groups such as the Game Grumps, Yogscast, and many other loved Youtubers. This is the story of how they fucked up, big. 

(Fun fact, the guy that wrote this article actually got fired for it VERY NEARLY GOT FIRED FOR IT, because the website it was published on is owned by Polaris.)

if you care about game development, the indie game scene, and/or the toxic environment of sexism in gaming at large, READ THIS ARTICLE AND THE THREE ARTICLES IT LINKS TO. It will be well worth your time.

Holy shit.

Tagged: sexismgamingsexism in gamingMatti Leshemgame jamfeminism

Source: paulsrockinpagoda

28th March 2014

Photo reblogged from to live and die before a mirror with 41,003 notes

roachpatrol:

exaltedreviewaverse:

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.
~Sam

Curb-cutter effect: I should use this term more often.

anyone putting up ‘you must be this disabled to deserve to use something that would make your life easier’ signs isn’t actually helping anyone who’s disabled! that kind of identity policing actually frightens people with disabilities and disorders away from getting help or using assistive devices when they do need them.
'justsjwthings' is the most appropriate fucking name ever for that shitty attitude. 

roachpatrol:

exaltedreviewaverse:

autistic-alligator:

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

I think I’ve left some good information in this response and it may be a good read for some of our followers.  Just a bit of history and a couple concepts in disability advocacy.

~Sam

Curb-cutter effect: I should use this term more often.

anyone putting up ‘you must be this disabled to deserve to use something that would make your life easier’ signs isn’t actually helping anyone who’s disabled! that kind of identity policing actually frightens people with disabilities and disorders away from getting help or using assistive devices when they do need them.

'justsjwthings' is the most appropriate fucking name ever for that shitty attitude. 

Tagged: autismsocial anxietylong post

Source: greencarnations

22nd March 2014

Photoset reblogged from Thursday's Child with 11,262 notes

Because mash ups are freaking awesome (listen)

Tagged: music8tracksmashupmasterpost